Writer, cook, reader, friend, thinker of shiny thoughts.

 

rurounigochan:

mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.

Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!

I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared.

Don’t be me.

As someone who’s done job interviews before, this is GREAT advice. While I personally didn’t mind if they didn’t have questions, hearing things like this would have been wonderful. It shows genuine interest in the job, both for fulfilling and even rising above it. Also, it helps inform the applicant if this really is the right job for them.

Businesses want their applicants to want them back. It gets very frustrating when you start/are in the middle of/finish training someone and they turn around and say, “Actually, I don’t like this.” That just puts us right back into the hiring process again, which can be time-consuming enough. We couldn’t have figured this out sooner?!

Often, no, because applicants forget that the interview process is about both parties trying to figure out if they’re a good fit for one another. Job-hunting can be hard and make you desperate, but whenever you feel it possible, don’t be afraid of “challenging” you potential employer to sell themselves to you. You both have needs and it’s fair to make sure both of you are happy.

And if they can’t meet your needs, or don’t even seem interested in trying, then as someone who’s been both employee and employer, I advise you to consider those kinds of companies/people really aren’t worth your time.

humansofnewyork:

“The economy’s tough. They say that to stay relevant in the job market, you’re supposed to reinvent yourself every five years. What the hell is that supposed to mean? I haven’t invented myself once!”

humansofnewyork:

“The economy’s tough. They say that to stay relevant in the job market, you’re supposed to reinvent yourself every five years. What the hell is that supposed to mean? I haven’t invented myself once!”

oneluv918:

WinCo is an employee owned grocery chain which pays its 15,000 workers at least $11/hour, offers health and dental insurance-even for part-time staff, and invests 20% of an employee’s salary into a pension which has turned 400 cashiers and clerks into millionaires. They are Wal-Mart’s worst nightmare.

oneluv918:

WinCo is an employee owned grocery chain which pays its 15,000 workers at least $11/hour, offers health and dental insurance-even for part-time staff, and invests 20% of an employee’s salary into a pension which has turned 400 cashiers and clerks into millionaires. They are Wal-Mart’s worst nightmare.

kickingshoes:

myfemalegaze:

geekisthecolour:

elijahfeathers:

cocobeef:

redsuitandtie:

commonersking:

sageofmagic:

memegrandpa:

helbows:

Introducing the Social Intelligence Test! From what I can tell, it’s sponsored by Harvard and it’s rather interesting. The basis is you look at pictures of people going through different emotions and decide what emotion they’re feeling. The trick is, you can only see their eyes.

How well can you read people? I never thought I was good at it, but I scored rather high on this test. It was a very interesting experience! I highly recommend taking this!

13 out of 36…

28 out of 36

26 of 36.

26 of 36 

31 out of 36.

YOOO WHAT

Your score on this test was 29 out of 36.

WELL I DON’T SUCK

30 out of 36…
I did notice though how most of the female examples are hard to read because they have that kind of unexpressive, glazed modelling look. Also pretty sure I saw Chris Evans & Keanu Reeves in there XD

33 out of 36

Woo!

30 out of 36. I’m honestly amazed. I hate looking people in the eyes so I assumed I’d get a lot lower.

Running Man for Newbies

audreyskdramablog:

Actually, this is specifically a Running Man for gwynnemeeks post, but I figure maybe someone else could find it useful. After many months of telling Gwynne how awesome Running Man is, she has finally started watching some carefully curated episodes (i.e. episodes that I think would appeal for her either because the episode is awesome or because she likes the guests for that episode).

This list is broken up into different stages—watch whatever episodes within stage 1 that sound interesting to you before moving on to stage 2. Many thanks to mrshobbes for helping me compile the list!

The first, bolded number will be the actual episode number, and the second number in parenthesis will be with DramaFever number.
Stage 1: Cast only OR a few guests
(Because you need to fall in love with the main members first and learn their variety personas.)
  • 91 (2) The Return of Yoo-ames Bond, in which there is both a prison break and a spy mission going on at the same time and Jae-suk is really stressed about everything.
  • 96, 97 (7, 8) with guests Park Ji Sung and IU, in which there is magical soccer and pretty much everyone is adorable.
  • 120, 121 (31, 32) with Lee Seung-gi and Park Shin-hye, in which there are secret agents and lots of ridiculousness.
  • 130 (41) Running Man Reincarnation, in which bizarre things happen to everyone and it’s really important, okay?
  • 131 (42) Running Man vs The Fighters, in which people who professionally hit other people terrorize the cast. 
  • 133, 134 (44-45) Asia Race: Macao and Asia Race: Vietnam, in which Ji-hyo does the tallest bungee jump in the world cuz she gets too tired/annoyed with an easier mission.
  • 135 (46) The Treasure Hunters, in which Jackie Chan speaks Korean, is adorable, and gets introduced to the acupuncture mats.
  • 147 (58) Flower Boy Athletic Competition, in which Kim Soo-hyun is adorable and maybe you can finally wash away the bitter aftertaste you have from You Who Came From the Stars.
  • 151, 152 (62, 63) Running Man vs The Grim Reaper and Early Vacation Race, in which this action star guy is seriously hot in one episode and then becomes a complete dork in the next.
  • 175 (86) Suspect Target Race with Gong Yoo (he’s hot, trust me), in which there is a very fun nametag ripping and some hilarious games.
  • 178 (89) Running Man vs The Writers, in which the cast is annoyed by all the ridiculous things the writers have made them do, and Ji-hyo is so tired from filming her drama she falls asleep on top of a giant Jenga tower
  • 200 (111) 2014 Dream Cup, in which we begin with soccer and end with a lot of up-close-and-personal moments with various animals.
Stage 2: Cast with several guests
(Now that you know the cast and their variety personas, let’s introduce you to some other awesome people. Not a lot of screen time for anyone, but the competitions are fun!)
  • 104 (15) Idol Summer Olympics, in which a bunch of pretty people compete in various “olympic” events and Lee Joon does ballet on a volleyball court.
  • 138 (49) Gentleman High School Club with Kim Woo-bin and Lee Jong-suk, in which there is a game of capture the flag that everyone takes way too seriously.
  • 161 (72) Pirates of the Western Sea with Shinhwa, in which 30-something boy band members are fantastic (pirate-flavored) competition for the cast.
  • 162 (73) Idol Summer Special, in which we have basically the best opening ever in Running Man history, and Jong-kook does the best girl group sexy dance ever.
  • 163 (74) The Battle for Ji-hyo’s Heart with Big Bang, in which Ji-hyo gets to be queen and the guys jump through ridiculous hoops (and muddy rice paddies) to win her heart.
  • 166 (77) Battle of the Heir’s Company Shares with Kim Woo-bin, Park Shin-hye, and Choi Jin-hyuk, in which Woo-bin and Jin-hyuk are adorable and kind of inept and…really, just be amused by them.
  • 182 (93) Letter From Hong Kong/Chinese New Year, in which a bunch of rising stars join the Running Man cast to do a bunch of (really cool) games that a fan came up with.
  • 188, 189, 191 (99, 100, 102) Adventure in Australia with Kim Woo-bin and Rain, in which everyone goes to Australia and get to do things that they are terrified of and/or make them look adorable.
  • 195 (106) Idol Athletic Competition with 2NE1 and 2PM, in which Jong-kook gets pissed off and the results are glorious.
  • 198 (109) Unbreakable Love Couple Race, in which Park Seo-joon is totally professional about the kissing game with Ji-hyo, and Jong-kook almost dies during his kissing game with his partner.
themoonphase:

bonsaibones:

I’m in love with this gif. Everything about it. The rain drizzling. The candle flickering. The colors. I love it.

favorite

themoonphase:

bonsaibones:

I’m in love with this gif. Everything about it. The rain drizzling. The candle flickering. The colors. I love it.

favorite

jenniferrpovey:

semiticsemantics:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.
His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.
He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.
He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.
Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.
It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:
You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. 
People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.
He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

I did not know anything about this guy. I need to fix that.
We need to remember that no country is homogenous. There were Germans who did things to oppose the Nazis, in courage and often in secrecy. No doubt many Japanese people disagreed with the policies of their government and Japan’s entry into the Pacific war.
As for him dying in nearly complete obscurity…I wonder if that was in fact his choice. Not everyone wants to be recognized.

jenniferrpovey:

semiticsemantics:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.

His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.

He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.

He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.

Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.

It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:

You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent.

People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.

He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

I did not know anything about this guy. I need to fix that.

We need to remember that no country is homogenous. There were Germans who did things to oppose the Nazis, in courage and often in secrecy. No doubt many Japanese people disagreed with the policies of their government and Japan’s entry into the Pacific war.

As for him dying in nearly complete obscurity…I wonder if that was in fact his choice. Not everyone wants to be recognized.